Poverty in your area 2016

End Child Poverty has published new figures (November 2016) on the level of child poverty in each constituency, local authority and ward in the UK.

  • Report – Download the full report on local child poverty figures here.
  • National press release: you can read the national press release about the figures here.
  • For any regional press releases, please contact Judith Cavanagh, the End Child Poverty Coalition Coordinator
  • Methodology: Further information about how this data has been gathered can be downloaded here.

Interactive map


Click and zoom in on the areas in the map below to find the level of child poverty in parliamentary constituencies across the UK. The darker the shading, the higher the child poverty levels in that area. View full screen.

Shocked by the level of child poverty in your area? Take action with us.

Notes and methodology

Households are living in poverty if their household income (adjusted to account for household size,) is less than 60% of the average. All poverty rates are calculated on an after housing costs basis. Read our full methodology.

Where child poverty is highest

The figures reveal the wide disparity in poverty rates across the UK, between regions and striking variations even within regions. Child poverty is the highest in large cities, particularly in London, Birmingham and Manchester.  As Table 1 illustrates, among the twenty parliamentary constituencies with the highest levels of childhood poverty, seven are located in London, three in Birmingham, and three in Manchester.

Constituency % of children in poverty 2015 (after housing costs)
1. Birmingham, Ladywood 47%
2. Manchester Central 45%
3. Poplar and Limehouse 44%
4. Birmingham, Hodge Hill 44%
5. Bethnal Green and Bow 43%
6. Manchester, Gorton 42%
7. Leeds Central 42%
8. Hackney South and Shoreditch 41%
9. Westminster North 41%
10. Birmingham, Hall Green 41%
11. Blackley and Broughton 40%
12. Liverpool, Riverside 40%
13. Middlesborough 40%
14. Sheffield, Brightside and Hillsborough 40%
15. Vauxhall 40%
16. Bermondsey and Old Southwark 40%
17. Nottingham East 40%
18. Glasgow Central 39%
19. Edmonton 39%
20. Nottingham North 39%
Local Authority % of children in poverty 2015 (after housing costs)
1. Tower Hamlets 44%
2. Manchester 40%
3. Westminster 38%
4. Islington 38%
5. Newham 38%
6. Birmingham 37%
7. Hackney 37%
8. Middlesborough 37%
9. Nottingham 37%
10. Southwark 37%
11. Barking and Dagenham 37%
12. Lambeth 36%
13. Leicester 36%
14. Blackpool 35%
15. Kingston upon Hull, City of 35%
16. Camden 35%
17. Sandwell 35%
18. Lewisham 35%
19. Waltham Forest 35%
20. Wolverhampton 35%

Where child poverty is lowest

The parliamentary constituencies with the lowest levels of child poverty are Gordon, West Aberdeenshire and Kincardine, Sheffield Hallam, and York Outer, with figures between 9 and 10 per cent.  The constituencies of Theresa May (Maidenhead) is among the 20 with the lowest child poverty.

Constituency % of children in poverty 2015 (after housing costs)
1. Gordon 9%
2. West Aberdeenshire and Kincardine 10%
3. Sheffield Hallam 10%
4. York Outer 10%
5. Wokingham 11%
6. Buckingham 12%
7. North East Hampshire 12%
8. Hitchen and Harpenden 12%
9. East Dunbartonshire 12%
10. Orkney and Shetland 12%
11. Henley 12%
12. Haltemprice and Howden 13%
13. North Somerset 13%
14. South Northamptonshire 13%
15. South West Surrey 13%
16. Winchester 13%
17. Witney 13%
18. Maidenhead 13%
19. Rushcliffe 13%
20. Horsham 13%
Local authority % of children in poverty 2015 (after housing costs)
1. Wokingham 10%
2. Shetland Islands 11%
3. Ribble Valley 11%
4. Hart 12%
5. South Northamptonshire 13%
6. Harborough 13%
7. Waverley 13%
8. Aberdeenshire 13%
9. South Oxfordshire 13%
10. West Oxfordshire 13%
11. Mid Sussex 13%
12. Mole Valley 13%
13. Rushcliffe 13%
14. St Albans 14%
15. South Cambridgeshire 14%
16. Uttlesford 14%
17. Chiltern 14%
18. Rutland 14%
19. Richmond upon Thames 14%
20. Horsham 14%

Sam Royston, Chair of the End Child Poverty Coalition, said;

“As the Prime Minister has rightly recognised, this is not a country that works for everyone. In every community, there are children being denied the happy childhoods and the good start in life other children take for granted. Our children are twice as likely to be poor as our pensioners.

“Families who are just about managing today, won’t be managing tomorrow if Universal Credit leaves them with fewer pounds in their pocket and if inflation means the pounds in their pocket don’t stretch as far as they used to.

“This month’s Autumn Statement is a major opportunity for the new government to act to help these families. We urge the Chancellor to reverse the significant cuts to Universal Credit targeted at working families and, at the very least, shield children’s benefits from inflation.”