End Child Poverty has published new figures (October 2014) on the level of child poverty in each constituency, local authority and ward in the UK.

  • Report – Download the full report on local child poverty figures here.
  • National press release: you can read the national press release about the figures here.
  • London press release: you can read the London press release about the figures here.
  • Methodology: Further information about how this data has been gathered can be downloaded here.

Interactive map

Click and zoom in on the areas in the map below to find the level of child poverty in local authorities across the UK. The darker the shading, the higher the child poverty levels in that area. View full screen..

Where child poverty is highest

The figures reveal the wide disparity in poverty rates across the UK, between regions and striking variations even within regions. London scores badly – containing ten of the top 20 constituencies with the highest child poverty rates in the UK and 14 of the 20 highest-rate local authorities. However there is variation within regions. For example, in London, Bethnal Green and Bow has a child poverty rate of 49% compared to 15% in Richmond-upon-Thames.

Constituency % of children in poverty 2013 (after housing costs)
1. Bethnal Green and Bow 49%
2. Poplar and Limehouse 49%
3. Birmingham, Ladywood 47%
4. Manchester Central 44%
5. Birmingham, Hodge Hill 43%
6. Edmonton 43%
7. Westminster North 43%
8. Tottenham 42%
9. Hackney South and Shoreditch 42%
10. Manchester, Gorton 42%
11. East Ham 42%
12. Birmingham, Hall Green 42%
13. Glasgow Central 41%
14. Hackney North and Stoke Newington 41%
15. West Ham 41%
16. Blackley and Broughton 40%
17. Bradford West 39%
18. Brent Central 39%
19. Leeds Central 39%
20. Bradford East 39%
Constituency % of children in poverty 2013 (after housing costs)
1. Tower Hamlets 49%
2. Hackney 41%
3. Newham 41%
4. Manchester 39%
5. Westminster 39%
6. Islington 38%
7. Enfield 37%
8. Birmingham 37%
9. Leicester 37%
10. Barking and Dagenham 37%
11. Haringey 36%
12. Camden 36%
13. Nottingham 36%
14. Brent 35%
15. Waltham Forest 35%
16. Middlesbrough 35%
17. Lambeth 34%
18. Lewisham 34%
19. Southwark 34%
20. Oldham 34%

Where child poverty is lowest

In 87 constituencies, the estimated child poverty level on the government’s before housing cost measure is below 10 per cent, the target set for 2020 in the Child Poverty Act. However, in many of these better-off areas, housing costs are high. On an after housing cost measure only two constituencies have rates below 10 per cent: Sheffield Hallam (the seat of the Deputy Prime Minister) and West Aberdeenshire and Kincardine.

Constituency % of children in poverty 2013 (after housing costs)
1. West Aberdeenshire and Kincardine 9%
2. Sheffield, Hallam 9%
3. North East Hampshire 10%
4. East Dunbartonshire 11%
5. Wokingham 11%
6. Edmonton 11%
7. Haltemprice and Howden 11%
8. Buckingham 12%
9. Gordon 12%
10. Orkney and Shetland 12%
11. South Northamptonshire 12%
12. Mole Valley 12%
13. York Outer 12%
14. Wyre and Preston North 12%
15. Sutton Coldfield 12%
16. Rushcliffe 13%
17. North Somerset 13%
18. South Cambridgeshire 13%
19. Winchester 13%
20. Hitchin and Harpenden 13%
Constituency % of children in poverty 2013 (after housing costs)
1. Shetland Islands 10%
2. Wokingham 10%
3. Hart 11%
4. Isles of Scilly 12%
5. South Northamptonshire 12%
6. South Oxfordshire 12%
7. Harborough 13%
8. Rushcliffe 13%
9. Mole Valley 13%
10. Ribble Valley 13%
11. South Cambridgeshire 13%
12. Mid Sussex 13%
13. East Dunbartonshire 13%
14. Waverley 13%
15. West Oxfordshire 13%
16. Vale of White Horse 13%
17. Elmbridge 13%
18. South Bucks 13%
19. Fareham 14%
20. Aberdeenshire 14%

“These figures reveal just how widely and deeply child poverty reaches into our communities, even those areas generally regarded as well off. Far too many children whose parents are struggling to make a living are suffering as a result and missing out on the essentials of a decent childhood that all young people should be entitled to. We can and must do better for our children. 

“Poverty ruins childhoods and reduces life chances. Failing to invest properly in children is a false economy: already child poverty costs the country £29bn each year and in the long run taxpayers will foot an even higher bill for correcting the damage.

“We are calling on politicians of all parties to urgently set out a clear roadmap towards ending child poverty which includes the additional actions needed and the measures by which progress will be tracked.”